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Discussion: Freakonomics

in: BorisGr; BorisGr > 2017-04-21

Apr 22, 2017 2:23 AM # 
Misha:
I love it. It's both fun and educational. Hardcore History sounds fun and educational, too.
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Apr 22, 2017 6:44 PM # 
Cristina:
Hardcore History is educational if you can stand to listen to him (I can't).
Apr 23, 2017 3:32 AM # 
Misha:
I think I see what you mean. However, I am not sure of the proper way to put my feelings into words here. How would you characterize the reason you can't stand to listen to Dan Carlin?
Apr 23, 2017 11:27 AM # 
Cristina:
When he talks he sounds like a guy who thinks very highly of himself and loves to hear himself talking. The episodes I listened to were of interesting topics and I wanted to enjoy them but I really didn't. I found it hard to follow what he was talking about and didn't enjoy his tone.

Thankfully there are zillions of podcasts out there so all of us can find ones we like. :-)
Apr 24, 2017 2:50 AM # 
Suzanne:
mmm...sadly, I have become skeptical about Freakonomics after finding out that the baby names chapter of their book was mostly incorrect ... and part of it was based on a common urban legend.
Apr 24, 2017 3:33 PM # 
cwalker:
Yeah, they lost me after the gun control episode of their podcast when they went on and on about how it was so clear none of the gun control proposals would have any effect but never once mentioned Australia.
Apr 24, 2017 4:08 PM # 
Misha:
The characterization of Dan Carlin makes sense.

Observational science is not easy. It takes special sort of talent to get it right when it is immoral and/or impossible to set up one's own experiments to test the predictions of a theory. I have heard similar, quite possibly a propos, skepticism about another piece of popularized observational science, one that actually combines history, social science and economics - the book Collapse by Jared Diamond.
Apr 27, 2017 1:28 PM # 
Becks:
I cannot listen to Radiolab after one of them gave the most poorly rehearsed, pompous keynote of all time at our Neuroday. It was really, really bad.

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