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Attackpoint - performance and training tools for orienteering athletes

Discussion: bird photos

in: PG; PG > 2018-02-18

Feb 19, 2018 4:25 AM # 
o-maps:
Great pics, thanks for posting these. Did you haul a looong telephoto and tripod down there, or if not, how in the heck did you takes these?
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Feb 19, 2018 12:16 PM # 
BillD:
Nice shots, nice collection of finds. Bespeaks an exciting treasure hunt not unlike finding flags in the forest.
Feb 19, 2018 2:04 PM # 
PG:
I have a very compact little camera, Canon SX50HS, that often frustrates me for its reluctance to focus on what I want it to focus on, but has a remarkable telephoto lens for its small size. It magnifies 50x optically and another 4x digitally. I've learned to not use the latter, just makes photos way too grainy. I think all the photos were shot at the 50x setting and then cropped/enlarged as desired.

No tripod. Always tried to brace the camera against something (vehicle, tree, fence post, light pole), though sometimes the light poles were vibrating from the wind and not much help.

And then you shoot 20 photos and maybe one of them is a keeper.... :-)

There is certainly more satisfaction for me in both seeing something interesting and getting a good photo than in just seeing it.
Feb 19, 2018 2:39 PM # 
PG:
The camera, lens extended / not extended. Gail got it for me on eBay a couple of years ago for about $250.



Feb 19, 2018 3:21 PM # 
kissy:
You need to clean your placemats. :-)

And, nice photos! Do you keep a Life Checklist?
Feb 19, 2018 3:35 PM # 
PG:
Yup. And not really.
Feb 19, 2018 7:30 PM # 
jjcote:
Did you take the pictures of the camera using the camera?
Feb 20, 2018 12:33 AM # 
BillD:
Your approach to adventure photography matches what several NatGeo photogs I have traveled with advise: compact camera, lockout the digital zoom, forget the tripod, brace with whatever is available.
Feb 20, 2018 12:42 AM # 
PG:
Bill -- it certainly made it a lot easier to just get around. Binoculars strap around my neck, camera strap over my shoulder. Nothing to assemble/disassemble at every stop. Very easy to carry for whatever distance we were hiking. I kept wondering beforehand if I should get a (much) better camera, but I didn't really want to deal with a big lens. Plus, of course, I could abuse mine pretty badly without any concern about damaging something valuable.

Had no idea the pros might do the same. I think I'm about as far from a pro as you can get. :-)

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