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Discussion: Nice!

in: anniemac; anniemac > 2020-05-05

May 5, 2020 9:27 PM # 
hughmac⁴:
Way to go!
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May 5, 2020 9:44 PM # 
Sandy:
Yes indeed, very nice.
May 5, 2020 10:53 PM # 
anniemac:
Thanks for the encouragement! I need it these days.
May 6, 2020 2:26 PM # 
hughmac3:
Hey! Just saw this. Sweet!
May 6, 2020 6:10 PM # 
JanetT:
That's great!

(I wish yoga helped my knees...)
May 6, 2020 10:32 PM # 
Sswede:
Woo hoo!
May 7, 2020 12:28 AM # 
anniemac:
@JanetT: what do you have going on with your knees?
May 7, 2020 1:12 AM # 
JanetT:
Too many falls directly impacting them (mostly the right) someplace or another, and perhaps a bit of one leg shorter than the other (per a PT office treating it about 10 years ago). Running isn't comfortable for long periods of time.
May 7, 2020 2:40 AM # 
anniemac:
One way to tell if one leg is shorter is by laying on your back and lifting your legs straight up. Glen can look for you: is one foot higher than the other? Or you can rest something across the feet that would help you see any difference.

One of my students has this, and she has knee problems too. We work on having her stand on a block with the shorter leg and letting the longer leg dangle — to help with balance and to open up some space in the joints. I think she also wears a shoe insert.

When you don’t do yoga, do your knees feel worse or better, or can’t tell the difference?

See now you got me all curious. Feel free to email me if you’d rather not have all this here ;)
May 7, 2020 12:53 PM # 
JanetT:
We've done legs-up-the-wall at yoga here setting a block on top, and I could see the difference.

If you don't mind the log overload, the discussion could potentially help others?

How does letting the longer leg dangle open up joints? I'd think it would be the other way around.

In any case, the knee pain when I run/jog* might be only partly caused by this imbalance and partly due to internal injury that I never got checked out (except getting it X-rayed once...inconclusive). At this point, I don't feel the need for speed, so I try to walk peppily when I walk. (Is peppily a word?) I'll run downhills doing O...

*When I first start out I land on the forefoot to protect the knee, until everything warms up and then I don't think about it too much.
May 7, 2020 1:31 PM # 
anniemac:
Yes yes, typed that at night and meant the other way! Which leg is shorter on you?
May 7, 2020 6:18 PM # 
hughmac⁴:
The forefoot strike is great, @JanetT! Make sure your cadence is high enough (90 left feet per minute), too. This is the "keep your running from hurting your knees" tip. If you're not naturally doing that turnover, it can feel waaay too fast at first, but that and the forefoot strike should really help, assuming you don't have other issues that preclude running in general.

I believe that proper squats and lunges are considered excellent ways to build up strength in all the 'stuff' around your knee, too, but don't do them myself, so haven't fully researched that claim.
May 8, 2020 12:59 AM # 
JanetT:
Hi Ann...right leg is shorter. Knee didn't hurt as much today as sometimes (pavement is brutal) so I jogged on a dirt trail at Tyler (after doing part of the O course there).

Hi Hugh, yeah, quad strengthening is part of what I *should* be doing (and part of the reason I'm biking again). I have Altra zero drop trail shoes that encourage me to run on my forefoot but it doesn't come naturally. I'm not sure I've ever gotten a cadence of 90! ~70 is more typical (see today's walk/jog).
May 8, 2020 1:36 AM # 
hughmac⁴:
Walking of 60 or so is great, but quicker turnover for the joggy bits may help! It’s really helped with my distance efforts.

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