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Attackpoint - performance and training tools for orienteering athletes

Training Log: PG

In the last 7 days:

activity # timemileskm+ft
  orienteering1 54:14
  road running1 20:53 2.0(10:27) 3.22(6:29) 31
  Total2 1:15:07 2.0 3.22 31
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Sunday Aug 2 #

orienteering 54:14 [3]
shoes: x-talon 212 #2

Scottish 6-day, day 1. Out of shape and a sore back but most of the time I can still find the controls.

The good -- finished second in M70, thogh it is tempered by being 4 minutes bac (to the Swede who won my class at O'Ringen last year). Also benefitted from a very late start.

The bad/ugly -- wrenched my back a couple of times, once dropping into a waterhole up to my chest on the way to 12. Was a struggle to get out. Hurting the rest of the way. May skip day 2, even though right now (after dinner and no booze or pain pills involved, it feels not as bad as I expected, sore but not the sharp pains when I try to sit down or stand up. Having to try to be positive, otherwise it is just depressing....

Added today's map in 3 parts (route is hard to see, but it's there, click on map for a larger version) --







Saturday Aug 1 #

Note

On the recommendation of Peggy/Nadim, stopped at Mr. Tan's for take-out after the sprint relay, took it back to our cottage in Dyke. Very excellent.

Friday Jul 31 #

Note

A fine day spent meandering around Skye with a little of everythinging, both referring to the sights and to the weather. Continuing my excellent taper.

And then in the evening a first-class dinner -- the food was OK, nothing special, it was the company that turned out to be the star. We chatted up the couple sitting next to us in the pub, and one thing just led to another. Gail got a taste of his haggis (that seemed enough to last the rest of her life), we found out about here career as a professional singer, the conversation overall was excellent. And then I popped to big question to him -- do you like whisky?

So first we got his favorites, he seemed particularly happy curling up with a 15-year-old Glenfiddich. And then his drinking habits (very very slowly, enjoying the aroma as much as the taste). And then we determined that it was time for me to step up, so both of us up to the bar, where we found out that they were out of his favorite, and didn't carry his runner-up (Glengarioch), so after a bit of consultation I opted for Glen Moray, which happened to be the special of the month and a mere three quid. Have to start somewhere.

And it seemed rather tasty. :-)

Very light and fresh, in fact. A hint of a nutty aroma. Generally well balanced with subtle overtones of oak, walnut, and citrus sponge. All in all, seemed like a nice introduction to the world of single malts.

Who knew? And nice at such an old age to have new pleasures to look forward to.

Thursday Jul 30 #

Note

Moving on, heading north, I remembered at some point that I had heard folks rave about something called "single malts," and I had no idea what they were talking about.

A little general research had identified them as a form of booze, therefore the popularity, also that each single malt was a unique taste. I clearly needed to know more. Obviously a distillery visit (or two, or three) was called for, but first some more education so I wouldn't appear so stupid.

It so happened, a little after noon, that we stopped for a wee bit to eat and drink at an inn well along on the road to Skye. The food and drink was more than adequate, but the significance of the stop was a discovery I made up at the bar of a little pamphlet describing all the single malts this place had to offer.

And what a collection. And here I'm referring not to the single malts themselves, but to the verbiage used to describe them. At which point, time for the photos.

Exhibit number one is part of one page (there were five or six pages overall). First impression was the flowery language. Who makes this stuff up? Second impression was noting the price of the first item (and I'm assuming this is for an ounce or two of the stuff). Must be really special.



Exhibit number two put number one to shame -- a sip or two of a 1969 Glenlochy for a hundred quid. Certainly better than the Highland Park from Isles that ends up tasting like wood shavings.



That last bit led me to further investigate the Islay region, and I found this --



Note the last sentence. "Its single malts are noted for their sea-weedy, iodine-like, phenolic character."

As Gail remarked, it would take a very special man to drink some of that.

I immediate thought she must be referring to Clem, both for the ability to drink the stuff and the style in penning the write-ups, but on reflection I am pretty sure Clem has higher standards for what he drinks, and his prose is certainly more obtuse. But he is still a very special man.

Though why is he not in Scotland?

Note

And then in the evening, a pre-birthday celebration for Gail, her last day at 66, at a very fine fish restaurant in Portlee. I was accused of dreaming up this "pre-birthday" notion to cover my butt in case I forget tomorrow that it is her birthday.

She may have a point there... :-)

Looks awful good for 66.



Wednesday Jul 29 #

Note

A proper day of tapering.

A little more in Edinburgh, mostly a really fine visit to the Museum of Modern Art (where "modern" usually means 20th century, so not really modern). But the stuff I grew up with. Spent several hours there.

Then a drive-by of the new parliament and the nearby royal residence. Maybe we'll find time to visit them before heading home, maybe not.

Then off to Sterling to visit its castle, also pretty cool, and we were greeted by the Waddingtons plus Izzy. Mike was amazingly cheerful for being lame (and he seemed sober). They gave us a copy of the castle O map, excellent.

Off to Skye in the morning.

Oh, almost forgot, weather is beautiful today, mixed sun and clouds, 70F. So we won't get 14 days of rain Maybe 13? :-)


Note

So two days of playing tourist -- castles, museums, etc. -- well, pictures of castles and museums are a dime a dozen. So all I will offer are the following. First, for just 250 quid a person, WCOC could upgrade to a really fine club outfit, and that price includes all 11 pieces. Think about it George....



But maybe that's not the look you want. So here is another option, a more traditional look. Note that this is only a small part of the outfit, but it was a public place so I passed on getting into the tights (and fancy shoes, and ruffled shirt, and codpiece one presumes). What think thee, George?



And then one artsy photo, just because modern sculpture is so often really cool....



Now off to Skye. Beautiful morning out. This is Scotland so rain gear will be close at hand.

Tuesday Jul 28 #

Note

Made it to Edinburg with little stress, having a nice cup of tea in the castle.

Supposed to go orienteering on Sunday, guess it's time to taper. :-)

11 AM

road running 8:59 0.8 mi (11:14 / mi) +31ft 10:50 / mi
ahr:135 max:154 shoes: pegasus 4

I forgot that it's hard to taper when you're not doing any training in the first place. So I went for the other end of the spectrum, over-distance, though cleverly broken up into two pieces so my body could handle it.

This was part one, a pleasant jog over to the Scottish Museum of Modern Art just to see what it looked like. Found a nice route over, partly along the "Water of Leith Way" (strange names for things here, though I guess the feeling is mutual when they visit the USA).

road running 11:54 1.2 mi (9:55 / mi)
ahr:128 max:137 shoes: pegasus 4

Spent a few minutes admiring some outdoor sculptures -- we'll have to make a proper visit tomorrow before heading north.

And then back on a longer route just for variety. Back was starting to ache so glad I wasn't going any farther. And, needless to say, not much energy.

Took a few photos, but can't seem to upload them. Maybe tomorrow.

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