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Training Log Archive: j-man

In the 17 days ending Oct 28, 2012:

activity # timemileskm+m
  Orienteering2 2:40:00 16.65(9:36) 26.8(5:58)
  Run5 2:23:00 0.8 1.29
  Map hike1 40:00 2.0(20:00) 3.22(12:26)
  Weight training4 27:00
  Total6 6:10:00 19.45 31.31
  [1-5]6 5:30:00

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Sunday Oct 28, 2012 #

Run warm up/down 8:00 [1] 0.8 mi (10:00 / mi)
shoes: October 2010 Oroc 280

Orienteering race 56:00 [4] *** 6.4 mi (8:45 / mi)
shoes: October 2010 Oroc 280

Fair Hill Red.

Too many thorns this weekend.

Map hike 40:00 [0] 2.0 mi (20:00 / mi)
shoes: Salomon XCR

Checking some areas at the new Brandywine.

Saturday Oct 27, 2012 #

Orienteering race 46:00 [4] *** 8.5 km (5:25 / km)
shoes: October 2010 Oroc 280

Washington Crossing Red.

Orienteering 58:00 [3] *** 8.0 km (7:15 / km)
shoes: October 2010 Oroc 280

Myrick Night O.

Friday Oct 26, 2012 #

Run 45:00 [3]

Weight training 6:00 [3]

Wednesday Oct 24, 2012 #

Run 30:00 [3]

Weight training 8:00 [3]

Tuesday Oct 23, 2012 #

Note

Just bunches of positive memories from NAOC.

The only downers, which were generally small, were during the relay...

(Dis) honorable mention:
Ross missing the last control! He had a great weekend, though, so I can't feel too badly for him. Sad for the rest of the guys.

1) One runner finished in a huff, and with expletives. Something about a control being down on the course. We were able to pry it out of him that it might have been #6 (which had the video camera/operator, and two epunch units.) Splits say he lost a lot of time on it. Every runner visited that control, and Tom went out to check it. Control was fine. This was a little strange, and may require a little more forensics.

2) Trevor Bray grabbed the womens' elite map, instead of his map. This is unfortunate, and I feel badly. There are obviously ways to further improve the distinctiveness of the maps, and we've discussed some creative solutions. Perhaps the coding on the back was too complicated/cryptic. Still, runners were briefed on the logistics beforehand, and ultimately it is their responsibility. But, we (or future organizers) can make this important task easier.

3) One other episode which was bizarre, and so far beyond the pale I couldn't believe it was happening. The only really sour note that besmirched the entire weekend, and while surprising, also consistent.

Run 30:00 [3]

Weight training 8:00 [3]

Monday Oct 22, 2012 #

Note

Really pleased with the number of survey responses. Hopefully, it wasn't onerous for people.

All feedback is much appreciated!

Note

Am I lucky or good? Probably a little of both.

(Everything except the stuff in the blue border--new, ex post--was provided to the announcers on Thursday night. Nev can confirm this.)

Capture

Note

Missed it a little bit on the relay...

Junior Women
Estimated: 40-45 minutes
Actual: 45:16

Junior Men
Estimated: 45-50 minutes
Actual: 52:02

Elite Women
Estimated: 50-55 minutes
Actual: 53:16

Elite Men
Estimated: 55-60 minutes
Actual: 56:28

Run 30:00 [2]

I couldn't walk last night. Today, the NAOC Party Mix powered me through a run.

Weight training 5:00 [2]

abs/dips

Sunday Oct 21, 2012 #

Note

Send out the NAOC survey.

Note

So impressed by so many people over this past weekend.

They all deserve their own encomium, and maybe I’ll get to those.

Here is one snippet…

Hugh, who stupidly agreed to oversee getting video results in the arena, and did so with aplomb, was counting on getting dedicated stands for the monitors, provided at minimal cost. The provider balked, and they would have come to $3,500. Two weeks before the event. So, what does he do? He just engineers and builds the TOP (TowerOfPower)—from scratch. Just one engineering marvel of many from the NAOC2012 TechTeam.

Note

For Tom, the accolades must be endless. A few highlights…

The matrix, mapping out the four days, down to the minute. The NAOC course setting binder. I mean, really—a binder? The marching orders and choreography to do the set-up, takedown, and set-up of two races in 30 minutes each. I have never seen anything more organized, and there is no one else I know who could have pulled this off. His willpower, preparation, and drive for excellence were singularly responsible for flawless technical achievement. The smile he allowed himself when it was over was priceless.

“You can be my wingman any time”. And hopefully, you feel the same.

Note

Ed and Eddie (aka E&E Enterprises.) Their ingenuity, their enthusiasm, and willingness to keep plugging away, despite long odds, and towering challenges. Their capabilities are astounding, and frankly frightening. Luckily, their skills are being committed to the pursuit of honor and righteousness, and orienteering happiness. In a more totalitarian nation, these gentlemen would be taken off the grid in the interest of national security.

Ed’s infectious smile, but ferocious finish face. Eddie’s cute hat.

Note

Sam is a college kid. He breaks his finger playing football, has surgery on Thursday in Ithaca, and is at PEEC (thanks to Fred!) Thursday night. No need to allow a “flesh wound” imperil the orienteering cacophony of the sprint on Sunday. A lot of people were surprised that a junior designed such awesome courses for a WRE and North American Championships. He got it done, with a whole lot of style.

Saturday Oct 20, 2012 #

Note

While I didn’t race this day, the memories will be treasured for a long time.

Out in the terrain at 7:30AM, vetting the string of controls along the eastern ridge. As I approached, the sun was coming up over the river, and a golden glow enveloped the forest, with glistening leaves accentuated with coruscating lights. And an enveloping stillness. Then, as passed by one of the marshes, a very large and frightened creature crashed and splashed across it, away from me. I know it is most likely not the case, but I would like to think that it was a moose that came to visit.

Then, back to PEEC for a spell of hanging, but then with urgency—taxing the handling capabilities of the SUV—careened back to the arena, and was stoked by the racing.

Next, control pick-up. Apparently, Tom was dissatisfied by my speed in the morning, so I took it upon myself to remove the entire SW quadrant, including 5 water stops. But, I got what I wanted. I was there in the gloaming. Again, stillness, and the warm glow. The softness of the forest, controls there for me alone, with a few gentle tracks from runners that traversed those hills over the course of the day.

You all may have your own ontology, but my day was metaphysical to the utmost.

Note

At around 9:30PM, set out with the headlamp and the controls, to set the S-most relay points. Almost ebone style. No compass. Tom took the NW ones, which aren't trivial, IMO.

Had some troubles, but got it done. At the saddle control, I thought I heard howling in the distance, and was happy to be on my way. As I got out to one of the trails, I noted a shining light off to my left. Was it Christine?

Then, after meeting Balter and streamering the route of the camera cable, staked the run to the start, and streamered OOB. No power tools this day after dark; I’d have to get that done during the sprint.

Friday Oct 19, 2012 #

Note

NAOC middle.

Tuesday Oct 16, 2012 #

Note

The enemy at Adams Creek harries us with more urgency. A FAED is lost and the forest cloaks dark secrets.

The winds of chance buffet us; our forces fall one by one.

The gods seek to confound the dreams of man. But, they cannot test the depths of our resolve, the content of our character, and our overwhelming will to overcome. The battle is nigh. Fatigue, fear, and doubt will have no station as we charge forth toward the everlasting dawn.

Note

Acquired another clip for the weapon, thanks to Amazon one day delivery. When the anticipated firefight against the relay forest occurs, I will reload, and press on, with no hesitation. Deadfall be damned. Entropy will be in a ragged retreat, stumbling out of the way of the forces of order and 5 mkms.

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